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Northern Powerhouse European Union

Oldham start-up launches £3.5bn lighting scheme

Solar Street Lighting has launched a funding scheme to help local authorities and businesses install LED street lighting powered by solar or wind technology.

Solar Street Lighting has launched a funding scheme to help local authorities and businesses install LED street lighting powered by solar or wind technology.

The company has developed hybrid LED street lighting that is powered by solar panels and wind turbines attached to each lamp and therefore free from day-to-day running costs.

It is offering a 100 per cent interest free financial package acquired through European funding to help organisations finance installations. It is aimed at government bodies, councils and established companies that have been trading for more than three years. 

Carbon footprints

Navid Dean, founder of the company, said: “With worrying issues of global warming, and local authorities and UK companies under ever increasing pressure to reduce carbon emissions and reduce costs, we wanted to play our part in helping to minimise the carbon footprint [of lighting].

“The fund can be used to replace halogen lighting and florescent tube lighting in various areas such as government buildings, halls of residents, hospitals, and council buildings. The concept is simple and delivers significant savings, whilst also helping organisations to become more energy efficient.”

According to Solar Street Lighting, its technology reduces energy costs of lighting by 80 per cent once installed. These savings can then be used to repay loans over a three to five year period and cover remaining electricity grid costs. 

LED efficiency

LED street lighting is increasingly popular with city authorities. Replacing all streetlights across the world with LEDs would slash global electricity consumption on lighting by 52 per cent, according to research.

Cheshire West is the latest authority in the North West to join the trend. It plans to upgrade 24,000 residential streetlights to LEDs by September 2018.