Skip to content
Northern Powerhouse European Union

Manchester NHS Trust in good health

A Manchester Trust has been singled out by the NHS as a best practice example of sustainability and carbon reduction after implementing a range of energy efficiency measures.

A Manchester Trust has been singled out by the NHS as a best practice example of sustainability and carbon reduction after implementing a range of energy efficiency measures.

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust established a sustainable development management plan in 2014 to tackle energy use, carbon management and low carbon travel.

After setting an annual carbon reduction target of two per cent per year, the Trust implemented a number of energy efficiency measures across its estate, including boiler flue gas economisers, building management system (BMS) optimisation, steam trap replacements, high efficiency lighting, plant room insulation and variable speed drives. 

Exceeding targets

An awareness programme was also introduced for the Trust’s 13,000 members of staff, supported by an automatic PC monitor power down initiative. 

Since 2013/14 the Trust’s total carbon footprint has exceeded targets. Overall it has decreased by more than 5.5 per cent, with energy-related emissions falling by 8.5 per cent. This is despite a three per cent increase in patients year-on-year.

The boiler flue gas economising work has been particularly successful by reducing gas consumption by 6.6 per cent, which is saving over £160,000 annually.

Staff travel

On travel, the Trust has used awareness campaigns, staff travel discounts, interest free loans and cycling facilities to reduce single occupancy car travel by over four per cent and increase ‘active travel’ by five per cent.

This work has been achieved with the support of Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM), which provided £27,000 in grant funding for on-site sustainable travel facilities.

The results are documented in the NHS’ latest annual sustainability impact report, which argues that more investment could save hospitals millions of pounds and free up cash for front-line services.