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Man City aiming for energy self-sufficiency

Following the announcement of a new corporate partnership with an energy storage specialist, Manchester City FC has revealed the progress it has made to date to reduce energy use.

Following the announcement of a new corporate partnership with an energy storage specialist, Manchester City FC has revealed the progress it has made to date to reduce energy use.

Earlier in May, the club announced a partnership with power management firm Eaton that will in the long-term develop innovative energy storage solutions for the stadium and academy buildings at the Etihad Campus.

Speaking to journalists at City Football Group’s London headquarters, director of estate development Peter Bradshaw outlined that the club’s aim is to “get as close as we can to self-sufficiency in terms of energy” at the campus development.

The campus is already virtually self-sufficient for water, having installed an 8 million litre rainwater harvesting reservoir, waste water recycling systems and bore holes for potable water.

Energy progress

“We've looked over the last ten years [at] how we use, manage and control energy and we've renewed a whole range of our products, equipment and facilities in the stadium: switchgear, transformers, LED lighting. We've really worked hard at how we become much more efficient in terms of the products that we've got inside our buildings”, Bradshaw told Clean Energy News.

The measures installed to date include absorption chillers, air source heat pumps and tri-generation combined heat and power (CHP). 

Over 5,000 LED lights have also been fitted, helping to reduce electricity consumption in the stadium by nearly one million kWh to date.

In addition, the club has also managed to reduce ‘fugitive energy’ – the energy used on unoccupied rooms, spaces and appliances – by 15 per cent, and it also has planning permission for a wind turbine on the site.

‘Responsible behaviour’

Speaking to edie, Bradshaw said: “The most important thing for us is responsible behavior. When we look at energy and sustainability, it’s about making sure that every measure is understood with regards to human impact and what our actions will have on others.”

“I would love to say we’ll be carbon neutral in the future, but it’s [currently] too bold a statement to make. It’s a fantastic vision to have, but what we’re trying to do is be efficient as we possibly can. This won’t just come from energy, but a basket of activities.”