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Green guide for hospitality sector published

Manchester Metropolitan University and Stockport-based Robinsons Brewery have produced a handbook to identify ways for pubs, restaurants and bars to become greener and more profitable.

Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) and Stockport-based Robinsons Brewery have produced a handbook to identify ways for pubs, restaurants and bars to become greener and more profitable.

Researchers from the university’s centre for enterprise and department of food and tourism management worked closely with staff at Robinsons Brewery and a number of pubs to trial a range of different measures that the sector can take to reduce environmental impact, save money and generate additional income.

The findings of the knowledge exchange project have been captured in the Greener Retailing Publicans Guide.

‘Useful advice’

The guide provides advice on reducing waste food and drink, improving energy and water efficiency and dealing with trade waste in innovative ways, such as generating additional income by selling waste cardboard and cooking oil.

Dr Tamara McNeill, senior research associate at MMU, said: “The handbook provides useful advice to help all managers in the hospitality sector to realise savings by going green.

“This is just the beginning. What we aim to do is start the conversation and facilitate a community of publicans and restauranteurs sharing best practice from inside the sector.”

Trailblazers

Pubs participating in the project have seen their profits grow as a result.

For example, Ian Booth, tenant at the Swan Inn in Wynbury, Cheshire, reported that refocusing on food waste had helped to increase its gross profit on food by 13 per cent.

“Once you start looking and actually going in the bins you start thinking, and [as a result] there has been a shift in what we do in the kitchen”, he said.

Another participant, Mark Gibson, tenant at the Bleeding Wolf and Wilbraham Arms in Stoke-in-Trent, said: “Generally just being involved made us think more. It opens your eyes to how much can be wasted.”

To read the full guide, click here.