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Northern Powerhouse European Union

Greater Manchester to test future-proofing software for local energy systems

The Energy Technologies Institute is working with Greater Manchester and two other local authorities to test its innovative software to design cost effective and future-proof local energy systems.

The Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) is working with Greater Manchester and two other local authorities to test its innovative software to design cost effective and future-proof local energy systems.

The ETI, a public-private partnership between UK government and BP, EDF Energy, Caterpillar and Rolls Royce, selected Greater Manchester, Newcastle and Bridgend County in Wales to help develop and test its innovative EnergyPath software in different local contexts.

Smart energy systems

The software, which is part of the ETI’s Smart Systems and Heat (SSH) programme, is designed to create location-specific smart energy systems that use local data to inform approaches to heat supply and demand management.

The first phase of the wider SSH programme, running from 2012 to 2016, has focused on developing software tools such as EnergyPath to help local authorities to create heat supply and demand management that meet local needs. 

Phase two from 2016 onwards will focus more on demonstrating that such a localised approach to energy systems can be adopted widely across the UK.

Local energy masterplans

Grant Bourhill, programme director of the ETI’s SSH programme, said “The EnergyPath software will help to identify what technical solutions should be used, where to deploy them and when they should be introduced - effectively creating a long term energy masterplan for a specific local area.”

“Before designing the software we consulted widely with local authorities over their needs for energy planning”, he added.

“By working in partnership with these local authorities to test the EnergyPath software it will help them to generate multi-decade, multi-vector local energy transition plans specific to their locations.”

Feedback from the three testing sites will identify areas of improvement ahead of the EnergyPath software being made widely accessible to local authorities in 2016.