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‘Gamification’ helping to improve driver efficiency

Allianz Insurance has partnered with a driving software firm for a new initiative that aims to turn efficient driving into a ‘game’ for fleets, where drivers could win prizes for cutting emissions.

Allianz Insurance has partnered with a driving software firm for a new initiative that aims to turn efficient driving into a ‘game’ for fleets, where drivers could win prizes for cutting emissions. 

The insurer is sponsoring a ‘driver of the week’ programme for companies using telematics services from driving specialists, Lightfoot. 

Lightfoot’s software is fitted to vehicles to track fuel consumption and vehicle efficiency, helping fleets to cut fuel costs and emissions, reduce accidents and prevent engine wear and tear.

Drivers are scored on issues such as aggressive acceleration, harsh braking, and unnecessary engine revving, which all increase fuel consumption.

Encouraging competition

The initiative will provide the best-scoring fleet drivers with the chance to win a range of weekly prizes, including weekend breaks and ‘supercar days’, as well as encouraging competition between fleets in national weekly leagues.

Lightfoot is also opening up the initiative to the so-called ‘grey fleet’ – personal cars used by employees for work.

The launch follows the completion of a successful trial in 2015, which improved the fuel efficiency of 99 out of the 100 private drivers that took part.

The long-term aim is to use the data collected to offer better insurance to the most efficient drivers.

Jonathan Dye, head of motor insurance at Allianz Insurance Plc, said: “Since partnering with Lightfoot in 2015, we have seen at first hand that their technology has a positive effect in reducing fleet customer claims. 

Other games

The concept of ‘gamification’ – using a game to engage staff or visualise improvements – is increasingly being used by progressive companies to improve sustainability.

For example, manufacturers such as Jaguar Land Rover have used simulation games to produce visual representations of a factory, where inputs or processes can be tweaked to see how efficiency could be improved. 

American aerospace and defence tech company, Lockheed Martin, has also created its own Carbon Footprint Reduction Game where staff earn points for watching educational videos on sustainability and taking action to improve energy efficiency at work. 

Other examples include the Look Up solar app developed by climate action group, 10:10. 

Launched in 2016, the app ‘gamifies’ the search for buildings which would be a good location for rooftop solar panels.

Energy demand response company Open Energi is exploring the potential of gamification to help reward residents for switching off their appliances in times of high demand.

The company is halfway through a three-year project with Northern Powergrid and app developer, GenGame, to encourage ‘players’ to complete achievements, track their progress and compete with one another for prizes.