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Food makers urged to join energy saving scheme

Bolton firm Love Energy Savings is urging food manufacturers of all sizes to join the government’s Climate Change Agreement (CCA) scheme before it closes, or miss out on ‘significant cost savings’.

Bolton firm Love Energy Savings is urging food manufacturers of all sizes to join the government’s Climate Change Agreement (CCA) scheme before it closes, or miss out on ‘significant cost savings’. 

CCAs are voluntary agreements between companies and the Environment Agency to reduce energy use and carbon emissions in return for a discount on the Climate Change Levy (CCL) tax on their energy bills.

Deadline approaching

If the company meets its targets, it receives a 90 per cent discount on the CCL for electricity and a 65 per cent discount for other fuels, on top of the savings it will already receive for improved energy efficiency.

The CCA programme will run until at least 2023, but the final cut-off for new participants is October 2018. The Environment Agency advises that applications should be submitted much earlier, by July 2018, to account for the time it takes to assess applications.

As long as a company is in an eligible sector, there are no size restrictions to joining. 

Food makers missing out

According to Bolton-headquartered energy comparison site, Love Energy Savings, food manufacturers such as bakeries and meat processors have been particularly slow to take up the opportunity despite using “energy-guzzling” machinery. 

“Ensuring you are registered to the CCA programme is easy and important for businesses in many sectors of the food industry, regardless of their size. Yet it is still something many forget”, said Mark Duffy, head of mid-market energy at Love Energy Savings.

“CCAs can be essential to driving energy efficiency improvements and will result in significant cost savings.
“There are certain sectors where there is less uptake than others. Bakeries in particular have been slow. Yet compared to other areas, the industry is very energy intensive. Even some of the smallest premises will have huge energy-guzzling industrial ovens.”