Skip to content
Northern Powerhouse European Union

Energy performance guide for building managers

Salford-based building energy specialist, ENER-G, has published a detailed guide to improving building energy performance for developers and estate managers.

Salford-based building energy specialist, ENER-G, has published a detailed guide to improving building energy performance for developers and estate managers.

The guide outlines the challenge of how to save energy by making buildings more efficient and employing low carbon sources of energy instead of fossil fuels.

Poor performance 

According to a recently completed six year study into the real-world performance of buildings by Innovate UK, many modern, non-domestic buildings are not meeting performance expectations.  

With the majority of buildings today expected to still be in use in 30 years’ time, and the Government targeting a 50 per cent cut in emissions from buildings by 2025 against 1990 levels, significant improvements will have to be made to existing and new building stock in future years.

Best practice

Measures to improve energy efficiency detailed in ENER-G’s guide include Building Information Modelling (BIM) and sustainable procurement, as well as standards and regulations such as BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology).

The guide also demonstrates how on-site, decentralised energy generation such as combined heat and power (CHP) can be used to improve energy efficiency, increase resilience and reduce costs. 

Clare Burns, marketing manager for ENER-G Combined Power, said: “This guide emphasises the importance of using the latest techniques and best practices to improve environmental performance and comply with regulations. 

“CHP has an important role to play – along with other green technologies – in reducing the long-term cost of construction, and safeguarding the environment for future generations.”

Building Data Exchange

Innovate UK has recently launched a new website sharing best practice and pitfalls in the construction and maintenance of energy efficient buildings.

The Building Data Exchange allows designers, developers and constructors to take advantage of the wealth of information gathered through Innovate UK’s £8 million Buildings Performance Evaluation Programme.