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Energy managers are the future - do you have one?

New research highlights the increasing importance of having a trained and tooled-up energy manager to optimise energy consumption and reduce emissions.

New research highlights the increasing importance of having a trained and tooled-up energy manager to optimise energy consumption and reduce emissions.

The research from consultancy Inenco and Stockport-based DJS Research provides insight into how the role of the energy manager will change by 2030, as pressure increases on businesses to improve efficiency and cut carbon emissions.

The role of the energy manager is predicted to become far more critical than today, but with gaps in skills and technology, businesses must start investing in the tools and training required, the report warns.

Required skills

By 2030, energy managers “will have evolved into the future utilities manager - a senior-level, digitally-savvy data scientist who will be responsible for making key strategic business decisions.”

As such, they will have a “broader remit” covering all business areas, including transport. 

Energy managers will need to be experts in dealing with Big Data and the Internet of Things, as well as be adept at “navigating new and complex energy legislation” and shifting their focus from simple energy efficiency activities to the identification of income opportunities from energy.

Meanwhile, with non-domestic energy still estimated to make up around 75 per cent of the UK’s ener-gy consumption in 2030, they will also be expected to play a key role in delivering the UK’s low car-bon agenda. 

‘Key decision makers’

Jon Bauer, chief technology officer of Inenco, said: “In the future, energy will be a decision point in all business investment choices. 

“Changes in technology and evolved social behaviours mean the future utilities manger will have ac-cess to real-time data and artificial intelligence, allowing them to make strategic decisions that will optimise a business’ own demand, instantly. They will ultimately be responsible for ensuring that the business they work for is aiding the UK’s transition to a low carbon economy.

“Unless businesses are effectively supported and are able to embrace best practice and innovation, meeting the UK’s energy targets could be under threat.”

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