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Brexit weekly news 18 November

Prof Alan Winters, the director of the UK Trade Policy Observatory, trade expert has suggested more than 60% of goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain could be subject to tariffs under the Brexit deal

Prof Alan Winters, the director of the UK Trade Policy Observatory, trade expert has suggested more than 60% of goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain could be subject to tariffs under the Brexit deal but goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain and deemed at risk of being moved to the Republic of Ireland would be subject to EU tariffs.

Brexit is delaying the potential launch of public-use electric scooters in the UK, says Sweden's Voi Technology, which claims Britain risks being left behind.
Fredrik Hjelm, co-founder and chief executive of the shared e-scooter firm, said he has held talks with the UK government about changing regulation.

Uncertainty around the decision to leave the European Union “made it too risky to put a gigafactory” in the U.K., the Tesla chief executive officer told automotive outlet Auto Express. Instead, the electric-car maker will be building its plant and a research-and-development centre around Berlin. 

British business investment has fallen 1.1% since the Brexit referendum in June 2016 and analysts warn that could cause long-term damage to the economy.

Nearly a third (32%) of freelancers reported that the Brexit process is having a negative impact on their business, with 9% claiming that Brexit has already cost their business over £20,000. Over half said Brexit has cost up to £5000 and nearly a third (31%) have experienced financial losses of up to £10,000.

Accounts for 2018 have been published by Gestamp Tallent Limited, showing how its performance has been affected by the UK’s imminent departure from the EU for a second year running, with chairman Francisco José Riberas Mera using the strategic report to highlight the effects of Brexit uncertainty.

The country’s claim that Australian farmers suffered losses and could continued to do so won immediate support from 14 countries including the US, India, New Zealand, China and Canada. Australia’s complaint, which was fleshed out in a formal proposal for compensation, related to the complex ramifications of Brexit on the inter-hemisphere meat trade.

 

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